[Headlines] Your First Quarter Check-In

Agitator editor Tom Belford has a sobering reminder for us this week – we are now a quarter of the way through the year. Hit me like a ton of bricks – where have the months gone to? Don’t worry – we still have over 8 months to catch up. But it is a good time to review how things are working (and consider stopping the activities that aren’t working).

Here are a few other articles and posts to help stay up-to-date on trends and topics facing the nonprofit world.

Happy fundraising – and here’s to changing the world (or at least our corner of it)!

Communications

Brilliant model for brilliant proposals for brilliant target groups! - 101fundraisingBrilliant model for brilliant proposals for brilliant target groups! @101fundraisingHaving trouble framing the right case for support for specific donors? Do all your proposals address roughly the same issues? Are all your proposals aimed at roughly the same target group? Are you looking to target a new type of donor? Are you looking for inspiration in framing your case … Recruit Donors to Spread Your Message with these 5 Tips - causevoxRecruit Donors to Spread Your Message with these 5 Tips @causevoxSince you only have so much energy and 24 hours in the day, the key to expanding your reach is to recruit donors to spread the word. Recruit donors to extend the reach of your crowdfunding campaign by getting them invested and giving them tools to spread your message to their networks…

 

Fundraising Planning

The AgitatorYour First Quarter Checklist – The Agitator @AgitatorEditorsThe first 90 days of the year — the first quarter — has now passed. No doubt you began the year with a work-related aspirational list of some sort — from New Year’s resolutions to a 2015 ‘to do’ list to a grand strategic plan for the year. So, with the first quarter behind you… How to Build a Sustainable Fundraising Model with Mid-Level Giving - The Digital DripHow to Build a Sustainable Fundraising Model with Mid-Level Giving – The Digital Drip @PursuantA healthy and long-lasting fundraising model is built day-by-day, brick-by-brick. What are the keys to ensuring your organization’s healthy future? Here are seven ways to maximize the middle of your donor pyramid to create a healthy balance for sustainable …

 

Fundraising Tactics

“Hangin’ with Henry” and talking about group solicitation strategies | Donor Dreams Blog @eanderson847This author learned the hard way that highly capable donors lowered their philanthropic sights when solicited in a group setting. He remembers learning that the smallest dollar amount mentioned during his presentation usually resulted in scads of pledge cards with that number on it… Stop saying: “Even a gift of $25 makes a difference.”… How I started my first Monthly Giving Program - @SandyRees via The Nonprofit Marketing BlogHow I started my first Monthly Giving Program – @SandyRees via The Nonprofit Marketing BlogSandy didn’t have a monthly giving program and didn’t know how they worked, but she knew she had to think quickly and sent the donor 12 reply envelopes to use to send in a gift each month. It would be simple for her, and Sandy’s first-ever monthly giving program was born… It was a simple beginning. Here are some other lessons from that simple start…

Leadership

Creating A Culture of Continuous Improvement Based On Data | Beth’s BlogCreating A Culture of Continuous Improvement Based On Data | Beth’s Blog @kanterPart 2 of this report covers new ways of thinking about organizational culture based in continuous improvement based on feedback. It speaks to establishing culture norms among staff of curiosity, reflection, and trust. It outlines the practices and skills needed to create a learning culture. Here’s what this writer learned:  Nonprofit and Business Directors Must Be Vigilant -- Board Liability Costs Could Be $2.2 Million! | Eugene FramNonprofit and Business Directors Must Be Vigilant — Board Liability Costs Could Be $2.2 Million! | Eugene Fram @HuffPostBizNonprofit board members, as volunteers, can be hesitant to be rigorous in their evaluations of the organization and the CEO. Such board laxity, in the long run, can lead to board conflict, require additional board meetings and cause personal rifts with colleagues or friends. Based on the outcome of the Lemington Homes case, not being rigorous about their due care evaluation responsibilities can be very costly to nonprofit directors…

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